COVID-19: The Effect of Lockdown on Children’s Remote Learning Experience – Parents’ Perspective

Main Article Content

Datonye Christopher Briggs

Abstract

Aims: This online survey was done to explore parents’ perspectives on education of their children affected by the stay-at-home measures still ongoing in the country.

Study Design:  Cross-sectional study design.

Place and Duration of Study: Sample: All six Geopolitical Zones in Nigeria, from May 9 to June 8, 2020 among parents residing in Nigeria.

Methodology: A non-probability sampling technique was used in the recruitment of participants. The study questionnaire on a Google Doc Form was administered through WhatsApp instant messaging. Chi-square was used to test for differences, and statistical significance was set at p-value less than 0.05.

Results: The 260 respondents who participated in the survey, had a median age of 38 years (IQR=9); including 40.4% (105) males, and 64.2% (167) with tertiary education, 77.7% (202)  possess a computer device, 93.2% (234) have internet services and 55.0% (143) spend between N5,000 – N9,999 (13.1 – 26.2 USD) per month for internet services. Only 35.4% (92) had their children participate in the ongoing radio/TV learning sessions, 46.1% (120) educate their children with their computer devices at home, however, 40.0% (104) preferred an online based method of homeschooling. Overall, 70.0% (182) were dissatisfied with the level of homeschooling their children received. Respondents with higher education and income level were significantly more likely to possess a computer device, have internet access at home and prefer online classes when compared to low-income earning parents with secondary education and below.

Conclusion: There is a considerable lack of ongoing learning activities among children in Nigerian homes during the COVID-19 lockdown. Strategic context-specific blended learning approaches (including the provision of infrastructure for remote teaching and learning) are needed to mitigate the negative effect of school closures on the education of children.

Keywords:
Nigeria, child (ren), COVID-19, education, parents.

Article Details

How to Cite
Briggs, D. C. (2020). COVID-19: The Effect of Lockdown on Children’s Remote Learning Experience – Parents’ Perspective. Journal of Education, Society and Behavioural Science, 33(9), 42-52. https://doi.org/10.9734/jesbs/2020/v33i930257
Section
Original Research Article

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