The Microstructure of the Student Wellbeing Process Questionnaire

Main Article Content

Andrew P. Smith
Kirsty L. Firman

Abstract

Background: The wellbeing process model formed the basis of questionnaires that can demonstrate which factors predict negative and positive wellbeing outcomes. The Student Wellbeing Process Questionnaire (Student WPQ) uses stressor, negative coping, psychological capital and social support scales to predict positive and negative wellbeing outcomes.

Aims: The usual method of scoring the WPQ has been to sum relevant questions in each scale. The aim of the present analyses was to investigate the microstructure of the WPQ and examine the profile of individual predictor and outcome items.

Methodology: The research was approved by the ethics committee, School of Psychology, Cardiff University, and carried out with the informed consent of the volunteers (1481 psychology undergraduates; 89.4% female; 49.7% year 1; mean age 19.5 years). An online survey was carried out, and a MANOVA was conducted to examine associations between the wellbeing process predictor variables and the wellbeing outcomes.

Results: A multivariate analysis of variance showed that the majority of individual predictors had significant overall effects. Some of the predictors (optimism; self-esteem, developmental challenges; time pressure; avoidance coping) had significant effects on all outcomes, which explains the global effects of the positive personality and stressor composite variables. Negative coping variables had significant effects on all negative outcomes. Other variables had selective effects on specific outcome measures.

Conclusion: The independent variables from the student wellbeing questionnaire are good predictors of both positive and negative wellbeing outcomes. This is observed when either individual items or composite scores are used in the analysis.

Keywords:
Student wellbeing process questionnaire, student stressors, social support, psychological capital, coping, happiness, life satisfaction, stress, anxiety and depression.

Article Details

How to Cite
Smith, A. P., & Firman, K. L. (2020). The Microstructure of the Student Wellbeing Process Questionnaire. Journal of Education, Society and Behavioural Science, 33(1), 76-83. https://doi.org/10.9734/jesbs/2020/v33i130196
Section
Original Research Article

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